Anaphylaxis - Twitter summary from Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2012 meeting

In an EMS study, only 46% of participants recognized epinephrine as the drug of first choice for anaphylaxis. Only 36% recognized intramuscular (IM) epinephrine as the optimal route.

The new Epi device is called Auvi-Q in the U.S. (https://www.auvi-q.com). Will be called Allerject in Canada and released in early 2013. Who likes the U.S. name?

Allerject device may have a slightly shorter needle length in the pediatric dose (0.15 mg).

Allerject has a 5 second countdown (spoken aloud) once needle activated to inform user how long the device needs to be in place. Allerject needle is retractable after injection and tells you if dose is successful.

AccEPT trial comparing Epipen to Allerject and showed bio-equivalence of adrenaline level in healthy subjects (AAAAI Abstract 2012).

Allerject batteries withstand taking device out of case once per week for at least 2 yrs without battery failure.

This 2-minute video shows the Sanofi's new voice guided Auvi-Q epinephrine injector in action:



This post concludes the Twitter summaries from the 2012 meeting of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (CSACI). They were made possible by the hard work and the updates of @allergydoc4kidz @DrAnneEllis @IgECPD4.

Here are all Twitter summaries from the 2011 and 2012 #CSACI meetings: http://allergynotes.blogspot.com/search/label/CSACI

Comments from Twitter:

David Fischer, MD @IgECPD: #CSACI Summaries: Anaphylaxis, Asthma, OIT, AD, Drug & Food Allergy. All summaries now available at Allergy Notes website by @Allergy Thx!

1 comment:

  1. Anonymous3/12/2013

    "Allerject device may have a slightly shorter needle length in the pediatric dose (0.15 mg)"

    Is this just a guess ("may have") or do you know for sure? What is the actual injected needle length is for the paediatric and adult device?

    Tx
    Jane

    ReplyDelete

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